Tag Archive | Thodoris Delis

Letter from Thodoris Delis

From Culmine (November 16, 2010) via Indymedia Barcelona (November 16, 2010):

The following letter from Thodoris Delis, who is charged with robbing a bank on the island of Rhodes, was recently published in the first issue of Storming the Bastille: Voices from the Inside, which brings together a number of texts and letters written by prisoners in struggle. The publication is one of the supplementary projects stemming from the Solidarity Fund for Prisoners in Struggle initiative.

Liberty is indivisible; one cannot curtail a part of it without killing all of it.

—Mikhail Bakunin, Federalism, Socialism, Anti-Theologism

For the past month-and-a-half, I’ve been experiencing the “marvelous hospitality” of Greek prisons. My voyage began with an inexplicably lengthy stay in the dungeons of Rhodes, my next stop was the transfer office on Petrou Ralli Street in Athens, and I ended up (at least for now) in Alikarnassos Prison on the island of Crete. Although I’ve been inside for too short a period of time to make sweeping generalizations, I’d still like to contribute my limited experiences to this very important project of creating a publication exclusively dedicated to the words of prisoners themselves.

Conditions in the dungeons of Rhodes were literally inhuman. Nevertheless, to seek freedom is strongly instinctive, and I therefore longed to glimpse a sliver of sky through a window somewhere. But I soon learned that windows are considered a kind of luxury. The cells were very small, and it was a struggle to breathe because a number of people had to fit into just a few square meters. There wasn’t enough room to sleep, and apart from the stifling conditions, the mattresses were stained with the urine and excrement of drug addicts, thus posing an obvious risk of infectious disease. I myself, for example, managed to stay awake for 36 hours because I additionally had to withstand incessant interrogation. With all this, plus the summer heat and lack of ventilation, I think each one of you can easily imagine the tragedy of the situation. Of course, I expected nothing better with regard to food, and it didn’t take long to confirm my suspicions. The meal given to us once a day was impossible to eat. Exhaustion and malnutrition were everyday phenomena.

Like I said, the next stop was the transfer office in Athens. There I managed to see the people closest to me, and thus steel my courage for the days to come. To my ears, “a visit” sounded magical, and seeing my people was the most wonderful thing that could have happened to me at the time, given how important the support of comrades and relatives is for a prisoner.

Then I was suddenly transferred to Alikarnassos Prison. Conditions there were just as harsh, and this soon sparked a prisoner uprising. There are cells, like mine, in which there is no toilet, meaning that many prisoners sometimes go as long as 13 hours without being able to meet their basic physiological needs. The size of the cells is roughly 10 square meters. Within are two to three people plus about 40 cockroaches, not counting other insect species, which naturally don’t leave you or your food in peace, resulting in frequent fights that we prisoners seem to be winning, for now. In addition, the “competent authorities” often prohibit certain products, even essentials like toilet paper and underwear. And finally, the meals consist of vegetables that look like surplus from the German occupation, and maybe some meat that seems a bit fresherwe’re guessing from the Junta era.

In this kind of atmosphere, and because a prisoner almost died recently thanks to the usual negligence of the jailers, the Alikarnassos prisoners rebelled on September 16. Considering that there are enormous differences in the “ethical,” economic, and political standards of prisoners here, the large scale and collective nature of the rebellion came out of nowhere. Particularly important during the events was the immediate response from comrades who, upon hearing news of the uprising, came from Heraklion by motorcycle to hold a solidarity demonstration. All prisoners feel the need for that kind of support and solidarity activity, and we saluted the initiative together. During the rebellion, there was no prisoner committee to make decisions or play ringleader. An informal assembly was held immediately, which essentially handled discussions with legal authorities, and all the prisoners were present during negotiations. It’s worth emphasizing that the mutual respect among prisoners stood out as the fundamental element of the uprising, as we all realized the urgency of solving vital problems in a dignified way. Finally, it’s important to mention that Albanian prisoners also took part in the rebellion en masse, despite the predominance of blatant racism against them here, due to—like they say—“things that happened in the past.” And the racism continues to this day: They have a separate yard and their cells are in another wing.

To conclude this letter, I want to salute all those who are doing the right thing, putting aside political and personal differences to support all political prisoners and prisoners in struggle. There’s a pressing need to understand that such nastiness is inappropriate, since we’re all facing similar situations. Finally, I unequivocally declare that I will keep fighting from inside the dungeons of democracycontinuously, intransigently, and irrevocably, just like I did when I was on the outside.

UNTIL THE FINAL VICTORY, FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF EVERY PRISON

FREEDOM FOR THOSE INSIDE

Thodoris Delis
Alikarnassos Prison
October 4, 2010

Updated list of anarchist/antiauthoritarian prisoners in Greece (November 16, 2010)

From Culmine (November 16, 2010) via Indymedia Barcelona (November 16, 2010):

People are being transferred very frequently. Therefore, this list will continue to be updated as needed. The mailing addresses of the prisons where our comrades are being held are written in Greek, but with Latin letters in order to make it easier for those showing solidarity from other countries to send letters and postcards. The way the addresses are written should make them understandable to Greek postal employees and civil servants.

At the moment, there are pending arrest warrants for 12 people from the anarchist milieu: six related to the Fire Cells Conspiracy case; four suspected by authorities to be accomplices of Yiannis Skouloudis; plus Marios Seisidis and Grigoris Tsironis, who have been in hiding since January 2006 (with prices on their heads) and are accused of the same bank robbery as Yiannis Dimitrakis.

Konstantina “Nina” Karakatsani
Katastima Kratisis Ginaikon Eleona Thivon
T.K. 32200
Elaionas Thebes
Greece

Karakatsani is charged with participating in the Fire Cells Conspiracy. A warrant was issued for her arrest on September 25, 2009, and she was ultimately caught on April 22, 2010. Her trial is on January 17, 2011.

Panayiota “Pola” Roupa
Kleisti Kentriki Filaki Ginaikon
Korydallos
T.K. 18110 Athens
Greece

Roupa was arrested with five other comrades on April 10, 2010 and charged with participating in Revolutionary Struggle. On April 29, she admitted to taking part in said group via an open letter co-written with Constantinos “Costas” Gournas and Nikolaos “Nikos” Maziotis. On July 24, she gave birth to her and Maziotis’ son Lambros-Victor.

Panayiotis “Takis” Masouras
Eidiko Katastima Kratisis Neon Avlona
T.K. 19011
Avlona, Attica
Greece

Masouras was arrested on September 23, 2009 and charged with participating in the Fire Cells Conspiracy. He has been in a juvenile facility since the beginning of his imprisonment. His trial is on January 17, 2011.

Harilaos “Haris” Hatzimichelakis
Dikastiki Filaki Koridallou-A pteryga
T.K. 18110 Korydallos
Athens
Greece

Hatzimichelakis was arrested on September 23, 2009 and charged with participating in the Fire Cells Conspiracy. His trial is on January 17, 2011.

Panayiotis Argyrou
Dikastiki Filaki Koridallou-A pteryga
T.K. 18110 Korydallos
Athens
Greece

Argyrou had a warrant out for his arrest since October 2009 on charges of participating in the Fire Cells Conspiracy. He was arrested on November 1, 2010 in connection with the mailing of a number of package-bombs. His trial for the Fire Cells Conspiracy charges is on January 17, 2011, while a trial date for the package-bombs has yet to be determined.

Gerasimos Tsakalos
Katastima Kratisis Malandrinou
T.K. 33053
Malandrino
Greece

Tsakalos was arrested on November 1, 2010 in connection with the mailing of a number of package-bombs.

Yiannis Skouloudis
Eidiko Katastima Kratisis Neon Avlona
T.K. 19011
Avlona, Attica
Greece

Skouloudis was arrested in Thessaloniki on October 13, 2010. He has taken responsibility for torching two vehicles belonging to the Public Power Corporation (DEI).

Thodoris Delis
Kleisti Filaki Alikarnassou
T.K. 71601
Alikarnassos
Greece

Delis was arrested on the island of Rhodes in August. He is charged with robbing a bank.

Alfredo Bonanno
Dikastiki Filaki Koridallou-A pteryga
T.K. 18110 Korydallos
Athens
Greece

The 73-year-old Bonanno might be the oldest prisoner in the entire country. He was arrested with Christos Stratigopoulos in Trikala on October 1, 2009 and charged with being an “accessory to a felony” for his alleged role in a bank robbery. His trial is scheduled for November 22.

Christos Stratigopoulos
Dikastiki Filaki Koridallou-A pteryga
T.K. 18110 Korydallos
Athens
Greece

Arrested together with Alfredo Bonanno, Stratigopoulos has taken full responsibility for the October 1, 2009 armed robbery in Trikala. His trial is scheduled for November 22.

Yiannis Dimitrakis
Filakes Domokou
T.K. 35010 Domokos
Phthiotis
Greece

Dimitrakis was arrested on January 16, 2006 after being seriously wounded by police bullets during a bank robbery in downtown Athens. Meanwhile, an arrest warrant was issued for three comrades alleged to be his accomplices. Two of them, Marios Seisidis and Grigoris Tsironis, remain at large. The third, Symeon “Simos” Seisidis, was arrested on May 3, 2010. In June 2007, Dimitrakis was sentenced to 35-and-a-half years in prison. After two postponements, his final appeal opportunity is now scheduled for December 6, 2010.

Polykarpos “Polis” Georgiadis
Kleisti Filaki Kerkiras
T.K. 49100 Kerkyra
Greece

Georgiadis was arrested in Thessaloniki at the end of August 2008 and charged with the kidnapping of industrialist Giorgos Mylonas, which took place earlier that summer. In February 2010, he and comrade Vangelis Chrysochoidis were each sentenced to 22 years and three months in prison.

Vangelis Chrysochoidis
Dikastiki Filaki Komotinis
T.K. 69100
Komotini
Greece

Chrysochoidis was arrested on the same day as Polykarpos “Polis” Georgiadis and received an identical sentence.

Evangelos “Vangelis” Stathopoulos
Kleisti Filaki Trikalon
T.K. 42100 Trikala
Greece

Stathopoulos was arrested on April 10, 2010 and charged with participating in Revolutionary Struggle. He denies all the charges.

Constantinos “Costas” Gournas
Dikastiki Filaki Koridallou-ST pteryga
T.K. 18110 Korydallos
Athens
Greece

Gournas was arrested on April 10, 2010 and charged with participating in Revolutionary Struggle. On April 29, together with Nikolaos “Nikos” Maziotis and Panayiota “Pola” Roupa, he admitted to taking part in said group via an open letter.

Christoforos Kortesis
Dikastiki Filaki Korinthou
T.K. 20100 Corinth
Greece

Kortesis was arrested on April 10, 2010 and charged with participating in Revolutionary Struggle. He denies all the charges.

Sarantos Nikitopoulos
Dikastiki Filaki Koridallou-ST pteryga
T.K. 18110 Korydallos
Athens
Greece

Nikitopoulos was arrested on April 10, 2010 and charged with participating in Revolutionary Struggle. He denies all the charges. He and Maziotis are isolated in a special wing of Korydallos along with certain prisoners from the November 17 leftist urban guerrilla group.

Nikolaos “Nikos” Maziotis
Dikastiki Filaki Koridallou-ST pteryga
T.K. 18110 Korydallos
Athens
Greece

Maziotis was arrested on April 10, 2010 and charged with participating in Revolutionary Struggle. On April 29, together with Constantinos “Costas” Gournas and Panayiota “Pola” Roupa, he admitted to taking part in said group via an open letter.

Alexandros Kosivas
Dikastiki Filaki Koridallou-A pteryga
T.K. 18110 Korydallos
Athens
Greece

Kosivas was arrested on September 17, 2010 and charged with a bank robbery that took place on the same day in the town of Psachna. He denies the charges.

Michalis Traikapis
Dikastiki Filaki Koridallou-A pteryga
T.K. 18110 Korydallos
Athens
Greece

Traikapis was arrested together with Alexandros Kosivas and a female comrade who was later released on probation. Along with Kosivas, Traiikapis is charged with robbing a bank in the town of Psachna. He denies the charges. He is also scheduled to face trial for his alleged participation in the riots during the 2003 EU summit in Thessaloniki.

Evangelos “Vangelis” Pallis
Kleisti Filaki Trikalon
T.K. 42100 Trikala
Greece

Pallis is an “ordinary” prisoner with antiauthoritarian leanings who was “politicized” in prison. He has been part of the struggle inside prisons for many years. His letters and other writings often appear in anarchist publications. A few days ago he was finally granted leave for the first time in eight years.

Aris Seirinidis
Dikastiki Filaki Koridallou-A pteryga
T.K. 18110 Korydallos
Athens
Greece

Seirinidis was arrested in Athens on May 3, 2010 (the same day as Symeon “Simos” Seisidis) during a random police identity check and initially charged with “weapons possession” (he was carrying a handgun) and “resisting arrest.” Using his DNA sample as the sole piece of evidence, he was later charged with a police shooting that happened last year.

Symeon “Simos” Seisidis
Nosokomeio Kratoumenon Koridallou
T.K.18110 Korydallos
Athens
Greece

A warrant was issued for comrade Seisidis’ arrest on January 16, 2006. He is charged with seven total robberies, one of which is the same bank robbery that Yiannis Dimitrakis is charged with. Seisidis was shot by police during his arrest on May 3, 2010 and suffered a serious injury to his leg, which later had to be amputated. He is currently in the prison hospital at Korydallos.

Updated list of anti-authoritarian and anarchist prisoners in Greece

From A Las Barricadas (October 15, 2010):

The mailing addresses of the prisons where our comrades are being held are written in Greek, but with Latin letters in order to make it easier for those showing solidarity from other countries to send letters and postcards. The way they’re written should make them understandable to Greek postal employees and civil servants.

Information about particular cases, as well as letters from many of the prisoners, have been translated into Spanish and English and can be found at various websites. Accordingly, this list lays the groundwork for the more frequent publication of news, letters, and updates regarding our comrades. The prisoners themselves are being transferred frequently. Therefore, this list will continue to be updated as needed.

It should be pointed out that right now three of the comrades charged in the Revolutionary Struggle case (Constantinos “Costas” Gournas, Christoforos Kortesis, and Evangelos “Vangelis” Stathopoulos) are in Korydallos Prison, but it’s not known whether they will be transferred together to the same prisons in the future. Additionally, Evangelos “Vangelis” Pallis—after he was found seriously wounded (with a glass shard stuck in his carotid artery) in his cell at Trikala Prison over a month ago—is currently in an Athens hospital, and his condition is improving. He is able to speak with the aid of an appliance that had to be implanted. Also missing from the list are the addresses for comrades Alexandros Kosivas and Michalis Traikapis, who are charged with a bank robbery in Psachna, and another two people (one of whom is Thodoris Delis) arrested in Rhodes this past summer.

Konstantina Karakatsani
Katastima Kratisis Ginaikon Eleona Thivon
T.K. 32200
Elaionas Thebes
Greece

Karakatsani is charged with participating in the Fire Cells Conspiracy. A warrant was issued for her arrest on September 25, 2009, and she was finally caught on April 22, 2010.

Panayiota “Pola” Roupa
Kleisti Kentriki Filaki Ginaikon
Korydallos
T.K. 18110 Athens
Greece

Roupa was arrested with five other comrades on April 10, 2010 and charged with participating in Revolutionary Struggle. On April 29, she admitted to taking part in said group via an open letter co-written with Constantinos “Costas” Gournas and Nikolaos “Nikos” Maziotis. On July 24 she gave birth to her and Maziotis’ son Lambros-Victor.

Panayiotis “Takis” Masouras
Eidiko Katastima Kratisis Neon Avlona
T.K. 19011
Avlona, Attica
Greece

Masouras was arrested on September 23, 2009 and charged with participating in the Fire Cells Conspiracy. He has been in a juvenile facility since the beginning of his imprisonment.

Harilaos “Haris” Hatzimichelakis
Dikastiki Filaki Koridallou-A pteryga
T.K. 18110 Korydallos
Athens
Greece

Hatzimichelakis was arrested on September 23, 2009 and charged with participating in the Fire Cells Conspiracy.

Alfredo Bonanno
Dikastiki Filaki Koridallou-A pteryga
T.K. 18110 Korydallos
Athens
Greece

At 73 years of age, Alfredo might be the oldest prisoner in the entire country. He was arrested with Christos Stratigopoulos in Trikala on October 1, 2009 and charged with being an “accessory to a felony” for his alleged role in a bank robbery. His trial is scheduled for November 22.

Christos Stratigopoulos
Dikastiki Filaki Koridallou-A pteryga
T.K. 18110 Korydallos
Athens
Greece

Arrested together with Alfredo Bonanno, Stratigopoulos has taken full responsibility for the October 1, 2009 armed robbery in Trikala. His trial is scheduled for November 22.

Yiannis Dimitrakis
Filakes Domokou
T.K. 35010 Domokos
Phthiotis
Greece

Dimitrakis was arrested on January 16, 2006 after being seriously wounded by police bullets during a bank robbery in downtown Athens. Meanwhile, an arrest warrant was issued for three comrades alleged to be his accomplices. Two of them, Marios Seisidis and Grigoris Tsironis, remain at large. The third, Symeon “Simos” Seisidis, was arrested on May 3, 2010. In June 2007, Dimitrakis was sentenced to 35-and-a-half years in prison. His final appeal opportunity was recently postponed for the second time, from April 28, 2010 to December 6, 2010.

Ilias Nikolau
Agrotiki Filaki Kassandras
T.K. 63077
Kassandreia Chalkidiki
Greece

Nikolau was arrested on January 13, 2009 and charged with planting an incendiary device at the Evosmos police station in Thessaloniki. On December 4, 2009, he was sentenced to seven-and-a-half years in prison.

Polykarpos Georgiadis
Kleisti Filaki Kerkiras
T.K. 49100 Kerkyra
Greece

Georgiadis was arrested in Thessaloniki at the end of August 2008 and charged with the kidnapping of industrialist Giorgos Mylonas, which took place earlier that summer. In February 2010, he and comrade Vangelis Chrysochoidis were each sentenced to 22 years and three months in prison.

Vangelis Chrysochoidis
Dikastiki Filaki Komotinis
T.K. 69100
Komotini
Greece

Chrysochoidis was arrested on the same day as Polykarpos Georgiadis and received an identical sentence.

Evangelos “Vangelis” Stathopoulos
Kleisti Filaki Trikalon
T.K. 42100 Trikala
Greece

Stathopoulos was arrested on April 10, 2010 and charged with participating in Revolutionary Struggle. He denies all the charges.

Constantinos “Costas” Gournas
Kleisti Filaki Trikalon
T.K. 42100 Trikala
Greece

Gournas was arrested on April 10, 2010 and charged with participating in Revolutionary Struggle. On April 29, together with Nikolaos “Nikos” Maziotis and Panayiota “Pola” Roupa, he admitted to taking part in said group via an open letter.

Christoforos Kortesis
Dikastiki Filaki Korinthou
T.K. 20100 Corinth
Greece

Kortesis was arrested on April 10, 2010 and charged with participating in Revolutionary Struggle. He denies all the charges.

Sarantos Nikitopoulos
Dikastiki Filaki Koridallou-ST pteryga
T.K. 18110 Korydallos
Athens
Greece

Nikitopoulos was arrested on April 10, 2010 and charged with participating in Revolutionary Struggle. He denies all the charges. He and Maziotis are being held in a special wing of Korydallos along with certain prisoners from the November 17 leftist urban guerrilla group.

Nikolaos “Nikos” Maziotis
Dikastiki Filaki Koridallou-ST pteryga
T.K. 18110 Korydallos
Athens
Greece

Maziotis was arrested on April 10, 2010 and charged with participating in Revolutionary Struggle. On April 29, together with Constantinos “Costas” Gournas and Panayiota “Pola” Roupa, he admitted to taking part in said group via an open letter.

Evangelos “Vangelis” Pallis
Kleisti Filaki Trikalon
T.K. 42100 Trikala
Greece

Pallis is an “ordinary” prisoner who was “politicized” in prison. He has been part of the struggle inside prisons for many years. His letters and other writings often appear in anarchist publications.

Aris Seirinidis
Dikastiki Filaki Koridallou-A pteryga
T.K. 18110 Korydallos
Athens
Greece

Seirinidis was arrested in Athens on May 3, 2010 (the same day as Symeon “Simos” Seisidis) during a random police identity check and initially charged with “weapons possession” (he was carrying a handgun) and “resisting arrest.” Using his DNA sample as the sole piece of evidence, he was later charged with a police shooting that happened last year.

Symeon “Simos” Seisidis
Nosokomeio Kratoumenon Koridallou
T.K.18110 Korydallos
Athens
Greece

A warrant was issued for comrade Seisidis’ arrest on January 16, 2006. He is being charged with the same robbery as Yiannis Dimitrakis. Seisidis was shot by police during his arrest on May 3 and suffered a serious injury to his leg, which later had to be amputated. He is currently in the prison hospital at Korydallos. In accordance with exemplary Greek judicial tradition, which burdens those at large with every possible unresolved “juicy case,” Seisidis is now being charged with a series of crimes including the two-year-old murder of a guard. However, in Seisidis’ case, the legal surrealism goes even further. Since the law doesn’t allow anyone to be tried for a felony in absentia, Seisidis (when he was still at large) was tried only for his alleged misdemeanor participation in the January 16, 2006 bank robbery. And for that misdemeanor he was given seven-and-a-half years in prison. The (rhetorical) question is: How could he be sentenced for a misdemeanor without the court recognizing his “guilt” for felony participation in said robbery?

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New arrests in Greece

From A Las Barricadas (October 15, 2010):

At 11:20 a.m. on September 17, 2010, four people in ski masks robbed a bank at gunpoint in the small town of Psachna on the island of Euboea, some 150 kilometers north of Athens. A half-hour later, on a country road near the island’s capital Chalcis, a 27-year-old man, a 28-year-old man, and a 35-year-old woman were arrested. They were brought to the Chalcis police station, where the men—Alexandros Kosivas and Michalis Traikapis—were charged with the armed bank robbery and the woman was charged with “aiding and abetting fugitives.” The charges were based largely on the comrades’ connection to the anarchist milieu (Traikapis was one of the Thessaloniki 7, along with two Spanish comrades and others, arrested during the riots surrounding the 2003 EU summit in that city and finally released thanks to a lengthy hunger strike) and dubious witness testimony (one of the witnesses, a kiosk attendant, supposedly remembered one of the comrades—just prior to the robbery—asking: “Excuse me, but where is the bank?”). The comrades didn’t have any weapons or “loot” on them at the time of the arrests, while searches of their Athens homes revealed nothing more than “ski masks, four 9 mm bullets, and other objects that are being investigated.” Nevertheless, Kosivas and Traikapis are currently in prison, while the woman was released on probation. It’s expected that they will soon write something that states their position regarding the charges, their political identity, etc.

Thodoris Delis

Last summer, two people from the Athens anti-authoritarian milieu were arrested on the island of Rhodes and charged with a bank robbery. One of them recently wrote a letter explaining what happened.

Comrades:

On August 16, 2010, I was arrested in Rhodes and charged with robbing an ATEbank. Because I am not limited by the perceived duality of “innocence/guilt,” and because I refused to cooperate with the authorities, the prosecutor and judge unanimously decided to imprison me. Before that, I was subjected to a number of draining interrogations by the uniformed servants of Power, both local and from Athens. The investigators were apparently under the control of the National Intelligence Service and sent specially from the Exarcheia police station to identify me and share information. They also tried, in vain, to implicate some of my personal friends and comrades in the case. They then locked me up in the Rhodes police dungeons, which is unusual. I was “visited” there by two psychologists, who examined me and put together what’s known as a “psychological profile.” Suddenly, they decided to move me to the transfer office on Petrou Ralli Street in Athens, where the people in charge refused to let me know which prison they would be taking me to. After an exhausting stay, they told me I’d be going to Alikarnassos, and it was only at the last minute that I was able to notify my family and friends about my destination. All the transfers have taken place in the manner we know all about, crushing every last bit of human dignity, while the prison was certainly not chosen by chance. It’s due to these reasons that I haven’t had time to state my position regarding the case. The judicial report still hasn’t been finalized, and they are continuing to collect evidence. Therefore, when I am able, I will write more extensively about my stance on several matters, generally and with regard to the movement.

I send comradely regards to everyone who stood by me and helped me in various ways. Additionally, I salute everyone participating in the very important initiative to create a prisoner solidarity fund, which I also took part in from the beginning.

Free everyone inside

Solidarity with all persecuted comrades

Solidarity with fighting prisoner Vangelis Pallis

—Thodoris Delis, Alikarnassos prison

Bonanno and Stratigopoulos

The trial of Alfredo Bonanno and Christos Stratigopoulos, charged with an October 1, 2009 bank robbery in Trikala and imprisoned since then, will be held on November 22. If anyone wants to support them with a monetary contribution, it can be wired to the account that was set up in Italy immediately after their arrest:

Postal Account No. 23852353
Payable to A. Medeot, CP 3431, Trieste, Italy

Any questions can be directed to:

Edizioni Anarchismo
A. Medeot
CP 3431
34128 Trieste
Italy
edizionianarchismo@gmail.com

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